Archives

Blog Archives

Art of Informal Learning – Rediscovering the Learners Pathway

Utilising ‘conversation frameworks’ (via @jaycross), such as
#Amplify, #Twitter, #Facebook and #LinkedIn is part of the social learning revolution. Creating communities of practice that effectively adopt such frameworks to support #learning is a trend that will change the way we learn; those who are not considering such methods will be at a great disadvantage in the future.

Clipped from www.lookforedu.com
 ”You go to your TV to turn your brain off. You go to your computer when you want to turn your brain on. “                                                                                                                   -Steve Jobs
Informal learning
“The best learning happens in real life, with real problems and real people, and not in the classrooms. ”
Formal learning
“Formal learning may not always be required… but it should always be available”
For example, Formal learning is like traveling in bus, the driver decides where the bus is going, and the passengers are along for the ride. People new to the territory often ride on bus before hoping on bike. Informal learning is like riding a bike; the rider chooses the destination, the speed as well as the route. The rider can stop anywhere to admire the scenery or to help a fellow rider.
Conclusion
The Informal learning is considered to be more effective in building proficiency than formal learning methods. That is the reason while hiring a candidate, experience and exposure will be taken into account more than mere degrees in the practical world.   It’s major plus is that learning will be mostly relevant and it is done in small steps in which the learner is a kind of entity in the overall happenings. So the learner can experience and then understand it thoroughly. Nonetheless, apart from all the formal learning we get, if we keep our eyes and ears open to any kind of knowledge that can be applied practically, we are on the right way to climb the cliff. This seems to be good clarity on informal learning about how it helps to enhance competency and professionalism of the talents of today to meet the changes and challenges in the future.

Read more at www.lookforedu.com

 

10 Levels of Intimacy in Todays Communication

As this was compiled in 2009 perhaps the designer had not heard of Amplify? Anyway, if he had, box no.1 would read Twitter, Box 2 Facebook, Box No. 3 Amplify with the rest remaining the same… be nice if it could be updated ;o)

Clipped from loichay.tumblr.com

Do you get a positive or negative feeling when you hear the word ‘Hacker’?

Having an interesting/strange/semantic conversation on Twitter about the word ‘hacking’ and its relationship to creativity and programming this evening.

Would like to poll the question to a wider audience, so please also RT with your comment… thanks.

Clipped from twitter.com
  1. Adrienne Michetti

    amichetti


    .@simbeckhampson why is that worrying? hacking is a form of creativity, something I try to encourage in teens I work with.

      Read more at twitter.com

      1. Adrienne Michetti

        amichetti


        .@simbeckhampson not at all. I think you have a very narrow view of what hacking entails/requires. Have you ever taught kids programming?

          Read more at twitter.com

          1. Adrienne Michetti

            amichetti


            Perhaps my hacker friends can help @simbeckhampson understand that hacking ≠ evil but does facilitate creativity.

              Read more at twitter.com

              1. Adrienne Michetti

                amichetti


                .@simbeckhampson aren’t hackers just creative prgrmers? they manipulate & tinker, a la Turkle. R U familiar w/her work? http://j.mp/bUlEMY

                  Read more at twitter.com

                  1. Adrienne Michetti

                    amichetti


                    .@simbeckhampson You’ll have to read her published work to understand what I mean, then. And no, NOT all forms of hacking are illegal.

                      Read more at twitter.com

                      1. Adrienne Michetti

                        amichetti


                        .@simbeckhampson you have “cognitive development” & “learning” in your profile. I’m very surprised you think so negatively about hacking.

                          Read more at twitter.com

                          1. Adrienne Michetti

                            amichetti


                            .@simbeckhampson hoping you are familiar also w/Seymour Papert? http://j.mp/czIS1h his and Mitch Resnick’s Constructionsim IS ALL hacking

                              Read more at twitter.com

                              1. Adrienne Michetti

                                amichetti


                                .@simbeckhampson Sure, I’ll ask my Twitter network right now. That’s 1,480 people (in theory).

                                  Read more at twitter.com

                                  1. Adrienne Michetti

                                    amichetti


                                    Hey Polly peeps: do the words “hacking,” “tinker,” or “manipulate” seem dark/negative to you? do they sound illegal? cc @simbeckhampson

                                      Read more at twitter.com

                                       

                                      What Parents Need to Understand in a Social Media World

                                      Hope parents get time to read this article!

                                      “Much of the concern about cellphones and instant messaging and Twitter has been focused on how children who incessantly use the technology are affected by it. But parents’ use of such technology — and its effect on their offspring — is now becoming an equal source of concern to some child-development researchers.” ~ Julie Scelfo

                                      Also made me think of mirroring…

                                      “Mirroring is the behaviour in which one person copies another person usually while in social interaction with them. It may include miming gestures, movements, body language, muscle tensions, expressions, tones, eye movements, breathing, tempo, accent, attitude, choice of words/metaphors and other aspects of communication. It is often observed among couples or close friends.” ~ Wikipedia

                                      How Kids Learn to Communicate in a Social Media World

                                      We have been asking ourselves what happens to children when they spend an average of seven and a half hours a day on media, when they text rather than talk? Will they learn to communicate?

                                      Now we are also asking what happens to children when we–their parents–are so absorbed with our BlackBerries, iPhones or iPads that it sometimes takes a child biting our leg to get our attention?

                                      children told me hundreds of stories of having to say “earth to mom,” or “earth to dad” to get their parents’ attention. This issue may have gotten more extreme (and social media can be particularly addictive) but it is an old issue.
                                      And social media isn’t bad or good either. We just need to figure out how we use it so that we can also “be with our kids.”
                                      They said that when they need their parents, they want them to “be there for them”–that’s what I called focused time.
                                      Each of us is going to have to find the right “fit” between paying focused attention to our kids and to social media.Read more at www.huffingtonpost.com
                                       

                                      Lacking Empathy says University of Michigan Study

                                      Yesterday I read a two articles posted via @socratoad “All about Dr. Robert Hare – Expert on the Psychopath” and “Psychopaths Among Us”, both were fascinating reads.

                                      Today I noticed this article which reports quite a dramatic decline in empathy amongst college students; lack of empathy is one of the characteristics displayed in (clinical) Psychopathic behaviour…

                                      I also found this link via Diane Bjorling which, although long, is very interesting – http://www.cassiopaea.com/cassiopaea/psychopath.htm

                                      One of the biggest notices from this article came at the end…

                                      “If we just open our hearts to all the misfortune around us, it would be just overwhelming,” she says.

                                      Time for a walk in the forest…

                                      Clipped from www.usatoday.com
                                      College students have less empathy than past generations
                                      College students today show less empathy toward others compared with college students in decades before, a study from the University of Michigan says.
                                      Sara Konrath, a researcher at the university’s Institute for Social Research, looked at 72 studies that gauged empathy among 14,000 college students in the past 30 years. She found that empathy has been declining — especially since 2000.
                                      The research finds that college students today show 40% less empathy vs. students in the 1980s and 1990s.
                                      The study did not evaluate why students are less empathetic, but Konrath says one reason may be that people are having fewer face-to-face interactions, communicating instead through social media such as Facebook and Twitter.
                                      “Empathy is best activated when you can see another person’s signal for help,” Konrath says.
                                      Michigan graduate student Edward O’Brian, who helped collect data for the study, says the “explosion” in social networking has caused college students to spend less time with each other.
                                      “You might spend your night posting on Facebook walls and sending out tweets to hundreds of your online friends, but by doing so, you’re also not spending time with real people and gaining valuable interpersonal experiences,” O’Brian says.
                                      Another cause may be changing expectations about success. Since the 1980s, there has been a steady trend in people feeling more stressed about trying to “get ahead,” Konrath says.
                                      “Empathy is a very important moral trait in terms of everyday caring for people in our environment,” she says.
                                      Raines says that empathy is declining in all generations and that people may be closing themselves off from others in response to the increase in the flow of information and bad news.
                                      “If we just open our hearts to all the misfortune around us, it would be just overwhelming,” she says.

                                      Read more at www.usatoday.com

                                      When Social Gets Too Much

                                      Morning Fog Emerging From Trees
                                      A Guy Taking Pictures / Water Photos / CC BY

                                      Hunky Dorey

                                      You’re twenty eight years old, recently married, first child on the way, a successful community manager for a leading retailer, and part of your daily bread and butter is updating the feed on Facebook or Twitter. You’ll spend an hour a day looking through your well researched RSS feeds for one or two relevant articles to post, and perhaps another hour commenting on posts and enganging with your community. Your sorted, your cool, no worries there. Continue Reading

                                      Social Media – Inspired by Scott Gould

                                      If you want to follow someone who know’s what’s going on in social media and you’d like to get better at blogging and social sharing, then start reading what Scott’s writing; bookmark his site after reading this.

                                      Why? Because he’s nailing it, proper!

                                      While researching the keywords ‘like minds’ I discovered Scott’s website some weeks ago, and after some basic research, I found out that he lives not far from my parents on the South coast of England. Taking this coincidence further I began skimming his blog and read a couple of articles in full, I quickly realised I’d stumbled across someone very talented.

                                      Digging a little deeper through Twitter and Facebook I began to know more about where he was coming from and got a glimpse of where he’s heading. At one point I just thought, I want to talk with this guy, so I found him on Skype, and we did just that. Scott very kindly obliged and we chatted informally about this and that, then the office began to pick up and it was time to say goodbye. The next time I’m back home I’m definitely going to pay him a visit, perhaps on a Sunday at his parish church.

                                      Since this conversation we communicate on Facebook from time to time. Interestingly Scott said that he really likes Amplify, but as he’s committed to his own blog it’s not practical to do both; although he does send interested parties in Amplify’s direction.

                                      Below I’ve snipped some of the key points from his latest post in order to give you a flavour, but I recommend getting to know Scott better by clicking through to his site and reading his posts in full, there is also a great video library called insights that should not be missed.

                                      @Scott, thanks for continuing to inspire my daily work, I already see the differences, and although there’s still lots of room for improvement, it’s nice to know you there if I get lost, cheers mate.

                                      Clipped from scottgould.me

                                      4 Issues With Comments, And Why Most Blogs Are Anti-Social

                                      I have four issues that I’ve drawn from the comments you made, and bolded the main points, as this has turned out to be a longer post than usual.

                                      Why Comments Matter

                                      connections trump community
                                      documented online

                                      The Issues

                                      1 – Readers don’t know what to comment
                                      who is writing about being a better commenter?
                                      2 – Bloggers don’t know what questions to ask
                                      skills of facilitation are really absent in a lot of bloggers
                                      Start valuing people – I mean really valuing people – individual people.
                                      when was the last time you really engaged in a comments section and were retweeting it because of the comments?
                                      4 – We don’t understand Social
                                      Social is all about people and relating with them (not to them).

                                      The Main Point

                                      Blogs that don’t ask meaningful, thought through questions and don’t engage in meaningful responses don’t value their readers and are anti-social.

                                      Your Leading Thoughts

                                      My question for you is:

                                      • Do you invite people to your house to then just talk about yourself, and reply to nothing your guests have to say?

                                      Read more at scottgould.me

                                       

                                      A word of thanks…

                                      Amplifiers too… :-)

                                      Clipped from www.facebook.com

                                      Innovative Blended Learning

                                      Innovative Blended Learning
                                      I haven’t said it for a sometime so now seems an appropriate moment to say A BIG THANKS to all those following and commenting on my FB, Twitter, Amplify, Ning, LinkedIn, YouTube (and other networks). I’m still learning lots about social media & communities, daily in-fact and imagine it’s going to be a long journey, quite probably a never-ending learning journey.

                                      As each day passes I try to offer a better balance between re-posting interesting media you may like or find useful and the individual uniqueness of the personal reviews and articles.

                                      If you have any suggestions or tips on how I can further improve, they would be most welcome – thanks again, all the best for now, Paul

                                      See more at www.facebook.com
                                      Page 2 of 3123
                                      • Show Posts From:

                                      • Top 5 Shared Posts

                                      • Social Share Statistics

                                        • 1,728
                                        • 535
                                        • 162
                                        • 216
                                        • 244
                                        • 571


                                      • follow us in feedly

                                      • Subscribe by email












                                      • Favourite Quotes

                                        We know that informal learning happens all of the time but often the best answers or experts are not connected to the person with the problem. Social learning networks can address that issue by giving each worker a much larger group of people to help get work done. — Harold Jarche, http://simbeckhampson.com/2010/08/30/understanding-social-learning-heres-a-good-place-to-start-by-hjarche/